animedistortion:

nihongogogo:

Universal Studios Japan is getting an Attack on Titan ride!

Does that mean you run around while naked people chase after you?

Well, from the looks of it, that might not be too far from the truth, it looks like it could be a live action maze type thing!

animedistortion:

nihongogogo:

Universal Studios Japan is getting an Attack on Titan ride!

Does that mean you run around while naked people chase after you?

Well, from the looks of it, that might not be too far from the truth, it looks like it could be a live action maze type thing!

Anonymous asked:

i know its bad to really really wanna live in japan and I wanna go their too. But I understand that my fantasy of japan is false. all these v/blogging by foreigners living in Japan is making it hard for me to overcome it. iv stopped watching/reading them but i cant unsee what iv seen. they make it sound so amazing, like looong vacation and best place to live on the planet. Can u suggest some vids/reading to helps overcome the lies?

thisisnotjapan:

Watch Japanese movies made by Japanese people and read Japanese books written by Japanese, in translation. Not anime, not SFF, but stories set in contemporary Japan. If you do that, you’ll see a much more complicated view of Japan that includes the bad as well as the good. 

There’s nothing wrong with fantasy unless you confuse it with reality in a horrifying racist way, which is basically what weeabooism does. So you need to counteract that.

This is the perfect response to this ask.

Grammar: ながら (nagara)

nihononthego:

This week’s grammar point is ながら, which can translate to “while” in English. It’s used to connect two verbs “to say that there are two actions being performed at the same time” (Banno et al., 119). These two actions can be performed either simultaneously or alternatively but within the same period of time (Johnson 135).

How to make the  ながら form

(Subject は) Verb Stem + ながら + Main Verb in any Form

For those who don’t know what a verb stem is, it’s basically the part of the verb that comes before -ます(masu)。 To form it, start with the masu form, and drop masu; what you’re left with is the verb stem. For example,

たべます > たべ   tabemasu > tabe
よみます > よみ   yomimasu > yomi
かいます > かい   kaimasu   > kai
のみます > のみ  nomimasu > nomi

Read More